Dr Daniel Connell

Dr Daniel Connell trained at Adelaide Central School of Art from 1997 to 2009 and has taught at the School since 2014. He has a Masters and a PhD in visual art investigating portraiture as a socially engaged practice. The majority of Daniel’s practice manifests as projects with recent migrants including SAPNAM, now one of Australia’s largest free and voluntary employment support services for new migrants which he and a small team began in 2017. 
 

Daniel has been a finalist in the Doug Moran Portrait Prize, The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize, The Fleurieu Art Prize, the Prospect Portrait Prize and a prize winner in the RSASA Portrait Prize 2019. He has undertaken multiple commissioned projects for SALA, the OzAsia Festival and the Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Centre which presented his TedX talk in Ubud 2018. He was invited to exhibit in the second Kochi Muziris Biennale (KMB) of Contemporary Art, India and invited to complete a residency with the KMB Foundation. Daniel was highly commended in the Australian Arts in Asia Awards. 
 

Daniel regularly visits India and was chosen as lead for the SA Government India engagement cultural program2017 He has created public art projects in the UK, US and Canada and was chosen to present his research at the School of South Asian Studies at Stanford University for the conference on Sikh and Punjabi studies. He holds degrees in Spanish Language and Latin American Studies and a Diploma of Education. 
 

Daniel has been on the board of Nexus Arts, the Racial Discrimination Ombud’s anti racism Roundtable and advisory roundtable for cultural diversity in the Women's and Children’s Health network. Daniel is on the MARRnet (Migration Asylum Refugee Research network) and is part of the 2020 Australia Council arts leadership program. 

 

images (l-r): SAPNAM workshops at ACE open as part of the exhibition Daydreamer Wolf by Elyas Alavi, 2019 photographed by Emmaline Zannelli | Portrait of Gobi, Charcoal on River Road wall, Kochi 2012, photograph by Vikas Ramdas